Best Time to Travel to Bhutan

Trekking is the only way to explore and find out what truly sets Bhutan apart from anywhere else and discover one of the most remote kingdoms on earth.

Whether you are looking for a day hike or a grueling 31-day adventure, Bhutan has it all. Pristine mountain lakes, imposing glaciers and some of the world's most endangered species await you in the mountainous amphitheatre of the Bhutanese Himalayas.

In Bhutan, where human settlements are far and few in between, the distance between townships and wilderness is blurred. Most often, within a one-mile radius, there are more trees than people. So they say the best way to see Bhutan is on foot, lugging tents and food on yaks.

Typically, you begin a trek in Bhutan from a forest of scented pine trees on the lower slopes before entering brooding oak forests where gnarled branches drip with velvety green moss. Above you cypress, spruce, juniper and birch cling improbably to sheer cliffs where their feathery branches catch the sun and line the mountains with tinsel. That's what you don't get in the rest of the Himalayas- the ancient forests.

What is culture?

What makes Bhutan so unique in this world of TV and Internet, where each culture is slowly merging into one another, in the inevitable process of globalization? It can be summed up in one word: culture.

Bhutan, the smallest nation, is one place where culture manifests in the way people live in: the way we dress, speak or conduct ourselves, shaped over the years by the Mahayana Buddhism. As it is, Bhutan is the last bastion of Himalayan Buddhism.

Buddhism has influenced all facets of life, art, architecture, literature, songs and dances, our societal norms, basically covering our approach to life here and hereafter. As you drive through the country, you will notice prayers flags fluttering on the hilltops, prayers written on rock faces or turning of mani dungkhor containing prayer scripts, enclosed in small chorten prototypes over streams, breaking the silence of the surrounding with a tinkle of a small bell, as it makes one full circle.

Watch the beauty in the swirl of a masked dancers dancing to the crashing crescendo of traditional gongs, cymbals and clarinets during tshechu festivals. Admire the grandeur of massive fortresses dominating the valley or an obscure temple ensconced in the folds of the mountains. Enjoy the pristine natural environment, wild life, wide open space under the blue sky, turquoise glacial lakes up in the mountains and the terraced valleys where people grow rice, barley, wheat, and vegetables and fruits.


In Bhutan, the most celebrated festival would most definitely be the local tshechu, derived from terms for date (tshe) and the number 10 (chutham). Appropriately, a tshechu is conducted on and around the auspicious tenth day (on which Guru Rinpoche was born) of a selected month (according to the lunar calendar), once every year.

The tshechu is essentially a religious event. The high-points of such festivals are the masked dances performed by both monks and lay men according to steps meticulously choreographed by Buddhist masters in the distant past. These dances, loaded with religious symbolism are memorable aural and visual experiences.

The atsaras (clowns), performing seemingly lewd but symbolically philosophical antics, pass on divine messages and blessings, at the same time ensuring that smiles and laughter do not run short. The atsaras are not the clowns, as they are perceived to be, but the acharyas, the learned ones, who pass on wisdom to the viewers through their jokes. Modern atsaras also perform short skits to disseminate health and social awareness messages.

It is believed that everyone must attend a tshechu and witness the mask dances at least once to receive blessings and wash away their sins. Every mask dance has a special meaning or a story behind it.

The best known tshechus are those of Paro and Punakha, held in spring and that of Thimphu in fall. Punakha and Jambay Lhakhang Druchens are also equally popular festivals. Almost every dzong or lhakhang celebrates tshechu.


Trekking is the only way to explore and discover one of the most remote kingdoms on earth.

Whether you are looking for a one-day hike or a grueling 25-day adventure, Bhutan has it all.  Pristine mountain lakes, imposing glaciers and some of the world’s most endangered species await you in the mountainous amphitheatre of the Bhutan’s eastern Himalayas.

The best way to see Bhutan is on foot, lugging tents and food on yaks, the quintessential beast of burden. Typically, you begin a trek in Bhutan from a forest of scented pine trees on the lower slopes before entering brooding oak forests where gnarled branches drip with velvety green moss.

Above you, the ancient forests of cypress, spruce, juniper and birch cling improbably to sheer cliffs where their feathery branches catch the sun and line the mountains with tinsel. As you climb higher beyond the trees through a field of trumpet gentian and edelweiss and gorse bushes, you emerge on to a landscape so bleak yet so beautiful with mountain ranges spreading all the way to the horizon

A trek in Bhutan may or may not affect your body. But it will certainly affect your spirit.


Bhutan is swiftly developing its reputation as a premier destination for adventure sports. Set amongst the majestic Himalayas our kingdom is the perfect location for all manner of exciting activities including Hiking, Trekking, Kayaking, Mountain Biking and Fishing. Whether it’s rafting down crystal clear, glacier-fed rivers or trekking through lush, virgin forests Bhutan offers a one-of-a-kind experience for travelers seeking adventure in an unspoiled and unexplored environment.

Rafting usually conjures up images of crashing through rapids and waves but in Bhutan it is a gently drift down the river admiring the scenery passing through a few exciting rapids. Most of the rivers in Bhutan are very steep and highly rushing. Thus only a few rivers are opened for rafting considering their safe course and easy access.

The rugged, mountainous landscape of Bhutan lends itself well to both on-road or off-road mountain biking and the sport is seeing increasing popularity among both visitors and Bhutanese alike. There is a variety of biking routes available ranging from smooth journeys on paved roads to challenging off-road dirt trails that wind through rough terrain.

The sport offers a certain intimacy with the environment that is seldom experienced in vehicles. With better roads replacing the old and the increasing number of off-road roads, biking is now becoming a very unique and original way of seeing and interacting with the country, people and the Bhutanese environment.

This section only covers kayaking & rafting and cycling. Trekking is covered under the sub-head trekking and so are bird watching and nature tours. Please check out the specific sub-heads for more information.


  • Your curiosity to discover Bhutan is genuine because you could find us any time 24/7..
  • Your curiosity to discover Bhutan is genuine because you could find us any time 24/7..
  • Your curiosity to discover Bhutan is genuine because you could find us any time 24/7..
  • Your curiosity to discover Bhutan is genuine because you could find us any time 24/7..
  • Your curiosity to discover Bhutan is genuine because you could find us any time 24/7..
Testimonials Sometimes a packaged holiday comes so much with a predefined set of takeaways, but The Destination Bhutan offered so much freedom of choice that it did not feel like a packaged holiday at all.


KH Zaman
Buffalo, New York



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